This Is What The Uncommon Valor Worthy Of A Medal Of Honor Looks Like

Proper greatergood_ctg_belowtitle

There is nothing that this author can add to the power of this video. This is the first time in the history of the Medal of Honor, since the Civil War, that the actual actions undertaken by the recipient of that award have been caught for all to see on video tape.

This even took place on March 4 2002 in Afghanistan. You will see what MSgt John Chapman did that day in an attempt to recover the body of a Seal killed by the Taliban and what he also did to save his own Seal team.

This video was captured by a CIA Predator drone and is narrated moment by moment. These moments occurred on the steep slopes of a mountain. The snow is deep and the enemy has the advantage of terrain.

But Chapman begins to take the offensive immediately.

Source: YouTibe/Dan Schilling Books
MSgt John Chapman faced withering fire head on, and cleared the way for an entire rescue team.


These are the last moments of a true hero, a real man for others, who gives his all to save the lives of his own team. Though wounded a dozen times, and though he experienced a moment of time when he could not fight, he recovers and though dying, pours heavy fire on the enemy in the effort to save the lives of the 18 man quick-reaction force that came out to aid the Seal team.

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Chapman enlisted in the United States Air Force on September 27, 1985.


The video is grainy and from a great height, but it is clear what Chapman does over that period of time.

Source: Wikimedia Commons
MSgt Chapman died while escorting a rescue team through an al-Qaeda terrorist stronghold on Takur Ghar Mountain.

There is no greater love that to sacrifice one’s own life for others. This video shows the courage MSgt John Chapman exhibited on that day, and the great cost he paid for those he knew in his team and for those of the 18 man quick-reaction force whom he did not know.

Proper greatergood_ctg_abovevideo

Though words are inadequate, the Veterans Site is deeply moved by the heroism and love of others that MSgt Chapman modeled for all of us that day in 2002. We can only promise to never forget and to continually honor the memory of this great man.

Honor! Respect! And our eternal thanks.

Read more from Veteran Dan Doyle: Click “Next” below!

Dan Doyle is a husband, father, grandfather, Vietnam veteran, and retired professor of Humanities at Seattle University. He taught 13 years at the high school level and 22 years at the university level. He spends his time now babysitting his granddaughter. He is a poet and a blogger as well. Dan holds an AA degree in English Literature, a BA in Comparative Literature, and an MA in Theology, and writes regularly for The Veterans Site Blog.
Proper greatergood_ctg_belowcontent